It’s National PT Month! 3 Things You Should Know About PT

October is National Physical Therapy Month. You may have seen the ads around with #ChoosePT. Although most people know what a PT is, many still do not know what we can do for you. So check out these three things you should know about PT.


We are doctors. PTs go to school for many years and receive a doctorate degree in the field. PTs learn about all systems in the body including the neuro, cardiovascular and musculoskeletal systems. We are trained in understanding the body's movement, function, and mechanics. We can assess and treat pain. But we also work across a broad spectrums of specialties including traumatic brain injury, cardiac rehab, pediatric care, women's health and of course orthopedics.

We have direct access care. All 50 States have what’s called “direct access” laws for people seeking PT. This means that a person can go directly to a PT for care, without getting a prescription from their doctor. Each state has its own specifics around these laws, but for the most part, you can consult a PT about pain and loss of function just by making an appointment.

We can treat a lot of things. Most people think of PT especially after a sports injury or while recovering from surgery. But PTs can treat a variety of medical and functional problems. Some PTs specialize in headache care or jaw pain. Others can help with recovering from childbirth (both normal labor or c section). Other people specialize in treating vertigo and balance issues. While other PTs can assess your workstation and design a more ergonomic space to reduce stress and pain. Many PTs choose to specialize in a field after they have obtained their degree. These specialties are often achieved by additional education and earning specialty certificates. You may notice them as abbreviations after the "DPT" in a PTs signature.

To learn more about PT visit our national organization at www.APTA.org or visit our blog at www.saramikulsky.com



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